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Tuesday, February 16, 2016

hair goes burgled from Simhachalam temple ~ : pathar marenge road par lok

At Vizag is the beautiful Simhachalam temple situate on a hillock ~ the deity stands covered with sandalwood paste throughout the year.  It has a scenic view with so many trees on the way.   An inscription dated 1098 AD of the King Kuloththunga Cholaprovides a clue  to its antiquity. Sri Krishna Deva Raya visited the shrine in 1516 and 1519.

Sure have heard and seen ‘pathar marenge road pur log’ video  ~ In olden days, traditionally, women used to sport long hair; school girls would have double plait, a complex pattern formed by intertwining three or more strands hair and wearing dhavani ~ half-sarees !!~ not any longer..!! ~ no point in discussing whether the hair possesses natural fragrance… .. it perhaps not restricted to women alone.  Slinga Malinga at various times sported different hairdos.  With ICC WC T20 about to start, Star Sports features the Dhoni advt – where hairstylist Sapna Bhavnani trying to convince Dhoni sport different hairstyles – one of which makes Dhoni say, that people will throw stones !  Finally, Sapna comes up with the idea of giving Dhoni the same look that he sported during India’s triumphant WT20 campaign in 2007 – the long-hair look.

Read that even some competition horses are plaited, provided tail plaiting is both permitted and appropriate for the horse breed. For some events, like stadium jumping, hunting, and polo, tail plaiting is mandatory. On the other hand, for some breeds, such as mountain and moorland pony breeds, the ponies should not have their tails plaited for competition.

Though uttered sometimes with disrespect – ‘hair’ is valued.  In the upmarket central London salon Inanch, a full head of Great Lengths extensions costs around £900, and lasts up to six months.  In many parts of the World,  hair is more than just a symbol: it is big business. From India to Peru, the human hair trade has spread across the globe, and it has the UK in its grasp. Last year HM Revenue and Customs of UK  recorded more than £38m worth of hair (human, with some mixed human and animal) entering the country, making the UK the third biggest importer of human hair in the world.

A couple of months back, couple of incidents made the Lancaster County Sheriff's Office investigate – it was the  second call of stolen horse hair.   A homeowner at  West Raymond Road told deputies someone had cut off half of the tails of two of his horses. While most people worry about being mugged for their phones or handbags, criminals in the Venezuelan city of Maracaibo have their sights set on something a little more unusual, reported Venezuelan digital newspaper Informe 21. According to  news sources, a gang known as the 'piranhas' is stealing women’s hair at gun point and then sell them to salons for use as hair extensions.   Robbers target women with long, straight hair as this type is most in demand for extensions. They force the women tie their hair into ponytails then hack them off.

If you thought Venezuela is bad – read this before making a comment.  Human hair worth around Rs 10 lakh was stolen from the premises of the famous Sri Varaha Lakshmi NarasimhaSwamy Temple at Simhachalam, newspapers state.

Unidentified persons stole 10 bags of "special grade" human hair valued at around Rs 10 lakh from the temple at Simhachalam, they said.  Preliminary probe suggests that temple insiders may be involved, DCP (Zone-II) G Ram GopalNaik is quoted as saying. Like the most sacred Thirumala, at Simhachalam too, devotees tonsure their head and offer their hair.  At Simhachalam, staff  of KeshKandanaSala (tonsuring centre) of the temple collect the hair and segregate them as per length and quality, which is then auctioned.  The temple EO is quoted as saying 15 bags containing "special grade" human hair were stored in a room near the KeshKandanaSala of which 10 bags were stolen.

The thieves reportedly  entered the store room of the temple, from the terrace using a rope. They cut the grille door on the terrace to enter the first floor and then unscrewed the pivot to gain entry into the store room, temple sources said. On a complaint filed by the temple management, police inspected the spot and are investigating.

With regards – S. Sampathkumar

16th Feb 2016

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